Xerox Toner: Fade Resistant?

Discussion in 'Xerox Digital Presses' started by kallenjm, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. kallenjm

    kallenjm Member

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    I work for a label company and we're looking to branch out our business a bit. We use a (bit out of date) Xerox Docucolor 560.

    Right now we print short-term usage labels on vinyl adhesive stock. These labels are applied outdoors and we've never had a complaint about the toner fading at all.

    Now we're thinking about branching out into bumper stickers. I'm aware this is far from the normal process for printing bumper stickers, but does anyone have info on the fade resistance of toner?

    My manager is convinced they won't last 6 months in direct sunlight, but I'm not so sure. What do you think?

    Cheers
     
  2. xfactor printing

    xfactor printing Senior Member

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    I've printed posters that have been in a window for 5 years without any noticeable fading of the xerox toner. Unsure how much the window glass protects them.
     
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  3. kallenjm

    kallenjm Member

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    That's a pretty sound endorsement. I can't imagine glass offers much UV resistance.
    I've had a couple of test bumper stickers on my car for two months or so, but it's winter in Minnesota so we don't really have alot of sunlight at the moment...
     
  4. Baz

    Baz Member

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    Not sure on Xerox toner, I've tested Oki toner on polyester self adhesive. Uncoated, the magenta faded out badly after about one sunny month over summer. A second test with a UV blocking laminate is still in perfect condition six months on. Don't forget that UV is not the only thing to worry about for a bumper sticker, it's a surprisingly harsh environment (washing chemicals, through the flailing brushes of a car wash, dust, scuffing etc.). Your sticker would likely fade out from washing before the UV kills it. Either way it won't last long without a proper laminate.
     
  5. kallenjm

    kallenjm Member

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    The labels have proven to be surprisingly resiliant to washing, scratching, etc. Again, I have a couple of test stickers on my car at the moment. It's up to -25 degrees (F) around here this time of year and I've had the car through the wash more than once this season.

    Still, thanks for the tip. I've never seen toner fade much, but I assume it doesn't help when the substrate is polyester or vinyl.

    What's the process you use to apply UV laminate to your labels? I think we had something at an old shop I worked at, but I don't remember it much.
     
  6. Baz

    Baz Member

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    I guess the Xerox toner is a bit tougher, I could definitely damage the print with some car shampoo and elbow grease on the prints I had from my Oki. With the 'bug remover' side of a wash mitt it scratched right through in places.

    In terms of fading, it wasn't something that immediately jumped out at you, but when comparing to the second copy that had been stored in a drawer it was very noticeable that the reds had dropped out.

    I used a digital overlaminate designed for use on sign vinyl, applied with a cold-roll laminator, but it could be applied with a simple signwriting squeegee.
     
  7. kallenjm

    kallenjm Member

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    Aaaah, I see. I knew about liquid laminate for sign applications but I didn't know there were roll laminators that were specialized for the job.
    Great! Thanks for the info. I have a better idea what equipment to look for now.
     

  8. Baz

    Baz Member

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    The laminate is a self adhesive film material on a silicone backing paper, either run it through a laminator or use a felt-edge squeegee to apply it to the printed work. Much quicker than liquid laminate, no drying time to worry about. There are all types of different films - gloss, matt, silk and some special prismatic options so it can widen your offering. I'm pretty sure they are all UV blocking.
     
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