KOMORI Lithrone ink keys cleaning project

Discussion in 'Komori Printing Presses' started by Vic the Printer, Apr 8, 2014.

  1. Vic the Printer

    Vic the Printer Member

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    Hi Everyone… Finally got around to cleaning an ink fountain that was completely frozen… not sure how this happened but I got the pleasure of undoing it.

    I must admit to having been scared to touch a fountain in the past based on other people's experiences… but other than being an extremely dirty job… all went smoothly, and it's very rewarding keys move so smoothly none stick or move when they're not suppose to…

    I'll be posting more pictures, and how I completed the project.. (the after)




    IMG_7484.jpg IMG_7473.jpg IMG_7492.jpg IMG_7480.jpg IMG_7490.jpg IMG_7489.jpg IMG_7486.jpg IMG_7496.jpg
     
  2. Deep River Hunter

    Deep River Hunter Member

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    what lube do you use under the tray??
     
  3. Spanner Man

    Spanner Man Member

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    Check if the corners on the cover blade are not bend, as this can cause ink to go under the cover blade when you have large sweep setting on your dwell.
     
  4. FSA

    FSA Senior Member

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    thats a project i've done too often, any question pm me

    FSA
     
  5. Vic the Printer

    Vic the Printer Member

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    More pictures

    there must be an easier way to clean dry ink :)
     

    Attached Files:

  6. FSA

    FSA Senior Member

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    You haven't even taken all apart yet , thete is probably ink Down under in what I call the piano keyboard, which affect the motors. Soak in a water missable wash, then scrap with a plastic autobody knife and then use a contact cleaner that has alcohol in it rinse with blanket wash and high pressure air hose. I usually let it soak in blanket wash for a day.
    This is not an easy job, my best time on overhauling a fountain was 1 week, longest I think was almost a month !

    FSA
     
  7. 5150pressman

    5150pressman Senior Member

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    Did this once and hope to never have to do it again.
     
  8. rasec2101

    rasec2101 Member

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    Amazing! What kind of solvent works to remove the dried ink?
    Good job
     
  9. Bill Borcicky

    Bill Borcicky Senior Member

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    I never wish this type of work on anyone, but I think we all have to dig in once every so often. Nice job Vic !
     
  10. presselectronics

    presselectronics Senior Member

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    Like Bill said "I never wish this type of work on anyone" but I would add that I'd wish it on everyone before me!
     
  11. alibryan

    alibryan Senior Member

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    You mention that the keys were so bad that the fountain was completely frozen, wow!
    I see you got it cleaned to satisfaction though. Cleaning the ink key assembly isn't that bad of a job, it should take a day or so and well worth it.

    The idea now is to keep them clean. Every time you pull the ink well plate off to clean, get all of the ink out of there, on the front of the keys and down below them where the little overflow trough is. And lubricate them every time with a light oil. That is the most important thing, lubrication!
     
  12. presselectronics

    presselectronics Senior Member

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    I would add that the small channel, just below the backside/lower of the key itself, is for grease. Make sure you keep it clean and then fill it with whatever grease you use on the press. It will stop ink from migrating up under the keys. Also go easy with the lubrication - it can cause the keys to float up and then ink can migrate in. . .
     
  13. alibryan

    alibryan Senior Member

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    If you clean the ink well when you wash up, I'm wondering how ink is able to migrate in underneath the keys. The only way ink can get into the keys is through the slots between them and in the hole in each key where the spring is. Those slots between each key by the way are for lubrication, that's why they're there.

    Also, the trough below the ink keys is not for grease, there's nothing there to lubricate. It is for solvent/debris overflow to keep it from falling into the ink train. It runs the length of the ink keys and beyond the rollers to the side so if solvent does get in there - as it often does - you can clean it out and it won't harm anything.

    I would not use any grease anywhere near the ink keys. Use a light oil (if you do some research, there's one or two brands that are far superior to anything on the market) and apply it into the hole in each key and into every slot on the side of each key after washing the well completely.

    If you wipe the front of the keys, (where they touch the ink ball) and lightly lubricate after each cleaning, the whole assembly will stay looking like new and the keys will perform flawlessly.
     
  14. presselectronics

    presselectronics Senior Member

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    If you look at picture "IMG_7473.jpg" you will notice a channel or slot on the left side that runs the length of the fountain. According to the Komori Technical Bulletin "Ink Fountain Key (slide type)" Maintenance, that channel is to be filled with grease to prevent 'ink from inflow'.
     

  15. alibryan

    alibryan Senior Member

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    Forgot to mention that when you did your tear down and cleaning of the ink keys, did you notice there was a number (scribed from the factory) on each key? They start with the number one and from left to right, go up from there. Make sure to put them back in order. You may notice a small 'break-in period' after reassembly, that's the keys getting used to each other again. Since you took them out and put them back, they need to reform any microgrooves between each other and it usually only takes a week or two.

    I cleaned all four units on the press I operate over the last six months and they all still look great and most importantly, work perfectly.
     
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