Ryobimatic problem

Discussion in 'Ryobi Printing Presses' started by eagledave, Mar 1, 2018.

  1. eagledave

    eagledave New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2018
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    Location:
    Richland, WA.
    I have a 9995 (3302H) that I bought new, and have used for over 15 years. I always thought the Ryobimatic water system was a bit touchy, but I've gotten used to it's quirks, until now. Those familiar with this system know how the water rollers have to be adjusted for the press to give good, consistent results. For some reason, the first unit's adjustment of pressure between the chrome oscillating roller, and the metering roller won't adjust to give an even, 2mm band across the length of the contact area. The last 2 inches of contact on the non-operator side looks like it's got more pressure, leaving a much wider stripe, in a fan shaped pattern, wider as it goes to the edge of the rollers. I've changed to new metering and form rollers twice to no avail. I've checked for out of roundness on all the affected rollers, but that seems OK. Anybody have some help, please?
     
  2. Ryobi Press Parts

    Ryobi Press Parts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2011
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    49
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    Call when you have a few minutes, I may have a few thing for you to check.
    Paul
    Ryobi Press Parts
    517-881-7114
     
  3. eagledave

    eagledave New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2018
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    4
    Location:
    Richland, WA.
    Paul, I do have an update. I managed to find OEM metering rollers, and upon adjustment, they behave exactly as aftermarket rollers. Straight bead across the roller, but for about 1.25" on the non-op side. (unit one only) Results in way too much water on the outside edge (non-op side) and no way to compensate. I'm thinking about buying a small compressor, or teeing off the press compressor to provide a steady stream of air to the outside edge of the ink rollers. Really a redneck solution, but if there's no other solution...
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2018
  4. Ryobi Press Parts

    Ryobi Press Parts Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    Call me back when you get a moment.
    Paul
     
  5. eagledave

    eagledave New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2018
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    Location:
    Richland, WA.
    Another update. I found out what causes the flare shape at the roller end. The lever that releases the metering roller from the pan roller works a cam, which you use to test the contact stripe, sort of slides the metering roller to the left, and not just straight down. This only happens on the non-op side, so I assume the metal on metal that actuates the cams has worn unevenly. Glad to solve that mystery, but it still doesn't explain why that end gets way more water, because this phenomenon shouldn't affect side to side water delivery when in printing position.
     
  6. seanryder

    seanryder Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2012
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    Location:
    USA
    We have a 3304 HA with the same water system. The lever to disengage the metering roller should not move the metering roller side to side, just up and away. Could be something worn that would cause side to side movement. And if it does move side to side you may not be getting a good seal between the metering and pan roller causing excessive solution to "seep" around the roller ends. This is just my observation obviously.
     

  7. eagledave

    eagledave New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Richland, WA.
    Thanks for your reply. I don't think your idea is what's happening on my press. All the pressures/stripes are measured with the metering roller engaged, and you can adjust the stripe with the usual controls, so the lateral movement shouldn't affect the stripe when engaged. I've one more idea to try, and then I'm all out... the pan pressure roller ( the stippled one) has never been replaced, so I'm gonna try that next, even though I've always thought that roller has little effect on the water control, due to it's non-adjustable nature.
     
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