Difference between high pile and normal delivery

Discussion in 'Heidelberg Printing Presses' started by cc1433, Jan 8, 2020.

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  1. cc1433

    cc1433 Member

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    Hi,
    I am in the process of purchasing a SM74, and we have got some offers with high piles. I would like to know what advantages would we have if we have a high pile, other than for the convenience for the operator.
    We do print alot of Solid sheets damperless in our current operation.
     
  2. Travis Young

    Travis Young Member

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    If you're printing lots of solids (dry or not) I guess you probably wouldn't really run huge stacks anyway. I wouldn't not buy a press because of a high pile delivery but the only real difference is increased efficiency on long runs.
     
  3. turbotom1052

    turbotom1052 Senior Member

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    A high pile delivery will allow for racking much better. In the event you're not familiar with racking I will explain. When running very thick ink films on the sheet there can be a tendency for the sheets to setoff in the delivery. To prevent the ink from setting off you need keep the weight of the piles low. Sometimes pile heights of as little as 4 inches on some jobs. On a longer run you wouldn't want to have a bunch of 4 inch delivery dollies or skids spread out all over your floor. This is when racking comes in. Instead of running a delivery load with 4 inches of stock, and then removing from the press, you simply run the 4 inch high lift of stock, and then place angle irons or something similar on all 4 corners of the freshly printed and still wet pile. Then you just put a plywood board on top of the angle irons keeping the bottom of the board from resting on the freshly printed 4 inch pile. On a low pile delivery you would be hard pressed to do many racks. On a high pile delivery you could do at least 3 and possibly 4. This makes for better production as you don't have to change out delivery skids as often and saves a bunch of floor space for freshly printed jobs.
     
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  4. Travis Young

    Travis Young Member

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    That's a very valid point and good practical advice
     
  5. cc1433

    cc1433 Member

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    Wow Turbotom, that was a great explanation, we actually current do a song and a dance when printing damperless solids, we keep unloading it off press every few sheets. Your explanation makes alot of sense. Makes me consider a high pile as a logical solution.
     
  6. alibryan

    alibryan Senior Member

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    Every high pile press that I’ve ever seen (by various manufacturers), comes with some sort of racking device. It’s designed into the delivery of the machine.
     
  7. turbotom1052

    turbotom1052 Senior Member

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    An additional benefit is that a high pile delivery is a lot easier on your pressman back. Ergonomically, the reduction in bending, to pull out sheets for inspection, will over the course of time make a difference in lower back pain. Ask me how i know.
     
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  8. turbotom1052

    turbotom1052 Senior Member

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    CC, Many people mistakenly believe that its the full coverage solids that require the most attention. It doesn't matter to me if the solid covers the entire sheet as long as its just a single color, run with an ink that's pigmented strong enough to not hiss on the rollers. Its when you start getting into double hit solids that things get interesting. But for me the most caution needs to be paid to them super rich blacks, on 4 color process builds, that so many designers and customers love to see popping off the page. These designers, or even some in house prep guys, will sometimes build rich blacks were the total ink coverage can exceed 300 percent. If your running rich blacks built with such high totals, I don't care if it just covers a square inch of space on the sheet, it needs to be treated with caution.
     
  9. cc1433

    cc1433 Member

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    Hi, thanks for everything, we finally locked in a SM74-2P , low pile due to the space restrictions. As we need to prep concrete on the floor for the machine was wondering if any one has an diagram of how the floor should be. As I was told that the four corners should be re-enforced.
    Hope everyone is safe from the Virus.
     

  10. junker1984

    junker1984 Senior Member

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    Four corners? Never heard that one before. Pad should be reinforced throughout with two layers of tied rebar. Thickness and/or pilings going down to bedrock would depend on your subsoil.
     
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