Anti-offset Powder

Discussion in 'Print Glossary' started by Color Printing Forum Admin, May 12, 2007.

  1. Color Printing Forum Admin

    Color Printing Forum Admin Administrator

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    A fine powder sprayed over the printed surface of coated paper as sheets leave a printing press to prevent ink from offseting from one printed sheet to the back of the next while wet. Anti-offset power allows printing on media that is more difficult for the ink to quickly dry on.

    Presses commonly time pulses of power to each emerging sheet.

    IR dryers can reduce the need for powder.

    Careful ink choice can also reduce the need for powder, but at the cost of other ink properties and price for quick drying inks.

    Anti-offset powder is also termed dust, offset powder, powder spray, and spray powder.
     
  2. imaysloh

    imaysloh New Member

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    if too much anti-offset powder been used, what the result?
     
  3. bluebeep

    bluebeep Member

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    You name it you will get it. Too much powder too many problems to list.
    buildup of powder on feeder
    ...........of powder on running in wheels causing marking on succesive runs
    ...........of powder on back cylinder
    ...........on grippers causes sticking grippers causes all sorts of hassle

    DEPENDS WHAT GRADE OF POWDER IS USED 1B is the usual for general work
    ALSO MAKES YOUR TEETH FALL OUT BECAUSE ITS MOSTLY ICING SUDAR
    Makes all old minders like me look like the old boy out of film with Bogey
    Called treasure of sierra Madre Ha Ha

    Dont use too much better to run small stacks no worries then

    Regards BLUEBEEP
     
  4. RichardK

    RichardK Senior Member

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    Sugar spray is very receptive to damp and can easily congeal in pipes, nozzles etc, but it is good for products that are going to be laminated, or for multi-pass work.

    The trick with any powder is to use just enough to prevent setoff.

    And thinking about the term isn't it Anti-setoff powder not Anti-offset? Leastways that how its always been sold here in the UK - maybe it's different across the pond.
     
  5. wijayasharon

    wijayasharon New Member

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    offset powder

    how to know wether it's enough using or not? tq..:confused:
     
  6. RichardK

    RichardK Senior Member

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    Run small pile, reduce spray, check for setoff if OK reduce spray again, run small pile, reduce spray, check for setoff.

    Repeat until you get slight setoff and then up the spray a little. Continue with small piles and check.

    Tedious but essential to ensure no over/underspray.

    Goes for any spray powder.
     
  7. wijayasharon

    wijayasharon New Member

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    tq for the reply. i'm gonna try it today. :)
     
  8. madjock

    madjock Member

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    I too believe that the correct term is anti set off powder, at least that is what is says on the boxes that the stuff comes in here in Canada, but people strangely insist on calling it offset, which as far as I remember is the process of lithography that we generally use, as opposed to direct lithography, ie the image is not offset via a blanket
     
  9. adamwatson

    adamwatson New Member

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    I want to know how much offset powder shall I use for printing small sheet?

    Thanks in advance...
     

  10. aqazi81

    aqazi81 Senior Member

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    Minimum sufficient to prevent sett off. Select proper micron size and type for your substrate.
    Read the post by Richardk.
     
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